Chopped grilled vegetable salad recipe

Photo by Sarah Elliott
Photo by Sarah Elliott

Sometimes, a little freshening up is in order.  I put this chopped grilled vegetable salad on my weekly dinner planner and when I pulled the image for it, I cringed a little.  The photo did not do it justice at all.  This salad is one of my absolute favorites and one that I posted almost 5 years ago.  In all fairness to me, I didn’t even know how to use a camera when I started this blog, and although I am still no photography expert, I think my images have improved since 2011.  So I thought I would pull this post from the archives and give it a facelift, especially on the eve of Memorial Day weekend when you might be inclined to make a fantastic, crowd-pleasing salad such as this one.

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Bieler’s Broth: a Healing, Restorative Soup Recipe

Bieler's broth | pamela salzman

It’s good to be home. I had the loveliest holiday break, but it’s good to be home. Even though I knew I was coming back to two weeks worth of mail to sift through, groceries to buy, meals to plan, piles of laundry to wash, it’s all good.

As I’ve mentioned several times, I am not much on detox diets or cleanses after the holidays even though they are all the rage. I notice a lot of people overdo it even more between Thanksgiving and New Years knowing they will “cleanse” it all off starting January 1. Eh. If you just try eliminating sugar and flour for a few weeks, your health will improve drastically. You don’t need to give up real food and sip juice for a week. But that’s just my opinion.

Bieler's broth | pamela salzman

However I do want to share an amazing, healing and very digestible soup recipe called Bieler’s Broth. This soup is nothing new. In fact, it has been around for decades, invented by a doctor named Bieler. The soup is vegan and all vegetable-based. It is not a culinary soup in the sense that it is so delicious that you would want to serve it to your friends at your next dinner party, but more of a medicinal soup.  It tastes absolutely fine though, just a little bland.

According to Sally Fallon in her book Nourishing Traditions, Dr. Bieler felt that this combination of vegetables was ideal for restoring acid-alkaline and sodium-potassium balance to organs and glands, especially the sodium-loving adrenal glands which suffer under stress.  The broth is also supportive for liver function — recall that the liver is our detoxifying organ.  Bieler’s broth is highly recommended for those under stress or suffering from stress-related conditions.  Know anyone stressed out?  Yep, I thought so.

Bieler's broth | pamela salzman

When I have had a lot of travel combined with a chaotic schedule and less than desirable eating, I’ll make a big batch of Bieler’s broth every few days and drink a mugful either as a snack during the day or with my breakfast or dinner. I don’t function well without protein and fats, so I can’t use this as a meal replacement.

I always notice a big improvement in my overall wellbeing after supplementing daily for 2 weeks with Bieler’s broth. I made a batch yesterday which should last 3 days and I’ll make another batch on Thursday to get me through the weekend.

Bieler's broth | pamela salzman

I know that the vegetables in Bieler’s broth are not in season in the winter. I am normally opposed to that, but in this case it’s just temporary. Be sure to buy only organic vegetables since this is supposed to be a healing soup and pesticides will just add more toxins to the body. Also, zucchini is now a common GMO crop, so buying organic ensures you will be buying non-GMO.

Bieler's broth | pamela salzman

Here’s hoping 2016 is off to a healthy start for you. If you’ve gotten off on the wrong foot, it’s never to late to start fresh. Do check out the dinner planner I started posting on Sundays!  It will change your life to plan out your meals.  Promise!

5.0 from 17 reviews
Bieler's Broth: a Healing, Restorative Soup Recipe
Author: 
Serves: 2 quarts
 
Ingredients
  • 4 medium zucchini, ends discarded and zucchini sliced into rounds
  • 1 pound string beans, ends trimmed
  • 2 stalks celery, chopped
  • 1-2 bunches parsley (flat-leaf or curly), tough stems removed (you can freeze the stems for stock making)
  • 4 cups water
Instructions
  1. Place all ingredients in a pot and bring to a boil. Skim any foam on the surface, lower the heat and simmer, covered until the vegetables are tender, about 15 minutes.
  2. Puree soup in the pot with a handheld blender or in a blender in batches.
  3. Eat warm.
Notes
I usually make this twice in a week and that will make enough for me to have a bowl every day.

 

Baked zucchini fries recipe

baked zucchini fries | pamela salzman

My kids can’t get enough of these zucchini fries and I can’t get enough of hearing them beg me for vegetables!  After I returned home from New York last week, my son, the one and only Mr. Picky, said, “I don’t know what you’re making for dinner this week, but please include zucchini fries!”  Pinch me.

cut zucchini into fries

I know the recipe is posted on the Today Show website, but I didn’t actually demo the recipe during my segment and I do have some tips to share.  Keep in mind, if you love zucchini fries when you go to a restaurant, these are similar, but not exactly the same.  Those are deep-fried, and we all know deep-fried food, EVEN A VEGETABLE, is really, really bad for you.  Sorry to remind you, but restaurants use the lowest quality oil to fry foods and they use it over and over and over again.  It is like a big vat of inflammation and free-radicals and transfats and likely GMO’s — everything you want to avoid.  So we’re going to bake these, ok?

baked zucchini fries | pamela salzman

They’re still going to be crispy and tasty, they’re just not going to be greasy.  Perfect reason to dip these fries into something.  I eat them as is, but my husband (just a grown-up kid really) likes these dipped in tomato sauce (homemade recipe here) or Ranch dressing (homemade recipe here) and my son will also eat them with mustard.   I find two things to be true with kids and vegetables — they love dips and they like things that resemble French fries.  That makes this recipe a double winner!

baked zucchini fries | pamela salzman

But I’m not going to lie — even though this is an easy recipe, requiring no special skills or culinary training, they’re kind of a pain to make because you’re dipping a lot of zucchini sticks into egg and then breadcrumbs and arranging them just so on a baking sheet.  My advice is to get your kids or someone to help you and then this becomes no big deal.  You can also cut the zucchini in the morning to save on prep time before dinner.

baked zucchini fries | pamela salzman

I know so many of you have zucchini coming out of your ears right now.  Try not to let them grow too big.  For this recipe especially, you want to select small to medium zucchini which contain fewer seeds and aren’t bitter like some big ones. And the trick is to cut them into the size no bigger than a normal adult finger.  If you cut them too big, they won’t get tender enough and if you cut them too small, they can get dried out.

baked zucchini fries | pamela salzman

The only problem with this recipe is that it never makes enough.  It says “serves 6,” but that’s hardly true.  I actually never got to eat 1 fry during the entire month I taught this recipe because there were never any left.  Once you start, you can’t stop.  So for the first time, I can’t answer the question “how long do leftovers last in the fridge?”  No matter how many you make, there won’t be any!

5.0 from 1 reviews
Baked Zucchini Fries
Author: 
Serves: serves 6
 
Ingredients
  • Unrefined, cold-pressed extra virgin olive oil
  • 4 medium zucchini
  • 1 cup dry bread crumbs (use GF breadcrumbs to make these GF)*
  • ¼ cup freshly grated Parmesan or Pecorino cheese (omit to make these dairy-free)
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • ½ teaspoon ground paprika
  • ⅛ teaspoon dried oregano
  • ⅛ teaspoon crushed red pepper
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt
  • 2 large eggs**
  • Unrefined, cold-pressed extra virgin olive oil spray
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Line 2 baking sheets with parchment paper and brush parchment with olive oil.
  2. To cut your zucchini into fries, cut each zucchini in half crosswise. Cut each half lengthwise into halves or in thirds, and each one of those pieces into 4 sticks or into ½-inch wide sticks.
  3. In a shallow dish, combine breadcrumbs, Parmesan, garlic powder, paprika, oregano, red pepper and salt. In a separate shallow dish beat eggs very well.
  4. One by one, dip each zucchini stick into the egg mixture, then into the bread crumb mixture. Shake to remove any excess and place on the baking sheet.
  5. Once all are coated with breadcrumb mixture and on the prepared baking sheet, spray with olive oil.
  6. Bake for 15-20 minutes, or until golden and crispy on the outside and soft on the inside, flipping over halfway to ensure browning on both sides. Serve plain or with marinara sauce or Ranch dressing.
Notes
*Do not use panko bread crumbs instead of the standard bread crumbs. They do not stick as well.
**You can also dip the zucchini in olive oil instead of eggs for an egg-free version.

baked zucchini fries | pamela salzman

For more great zucchini recipes, check these out:

Grain-free Chocolate Zucchini Cake (seriously the bomb!)

Zucchini-Gruyere Tart

Zucchini-Blueberry Bread

Zucchini Bread Pancakes

Corn and Zucchini Frittata

Summer Garden Frittata

Zucchini “Pasta”

Summer Minestrone

 

Corn and zucchini frittata recipe

zucchini and corn frittata | pamela salzman

I just returned from Dallas, one child and many suitcases lighter.  Sigh…. My daughter has officially opened her wings and flown from the proverbial nest to plant her roots at college.  The whole thing is quite surreal as many of you may or may not know.  One minute they’re spinning around in a pink tutu drinking from a sippy cup and the next you’re renting a mini fridge and lecturing them about why beer is the devil.

eggs and green onions

I actually met my husband freshman year of college.  So we couldn’t help but reminisce about our move-in experience and our crummy, old and unrenovated dorm.  I think my daughter was a little tired of my exclaiming every five minutes how her new dorm is “like the Four Seasons compared to where we lived!”  Of course you can’t furnish the Four Seasons with cinderblocks and plastic milk crates.  So we channeled our inner Nate Berkus and coordinated duvet covers with cork boards.  Funny, I do not remember my parents making two trips to Bed Bath & Beyond, two trips to The Container Store, a visit to the campus bookstore, Whole Foods, and, of course, amazon.com for anything and everything we didn’t find in the oasis of Dallas and that could be delivered in 2 days flat.  As another student’s exasperated father said to me after his ninth trip up the stairs with the umpteenth box, “My parents sent me to school with a towel.”  Yep.

zucchini sliced in a food processor

Even the food is better at college than it used to be.  My daughter’s school has a smoothie and juice bar in the dining hall.  I knooooow!!!!!!  So I kinda had to stick my fingers in my ears and sing a little “la-la-la-la” song when my sweet girl started to complain about what she was going to eat.  Not listening!

sauteed zucchini

In the week after we returned from Europe and before she left, I did indulge her with all her favorites though.  And it was my pleasure.  We had pasta with pesto, caprese salads, spanakopita, oatmeal-butterscotch chip cookies, veggie frittatas, acai bowls and on and on.  All for my daughter who was pickier than Mr. Picky and at 17 now craves fresh-pressed juices and veggie tacos.  Certainly, nothing beats food cooked by your mom who loves you to the moon and back.  I will miss cooking for my baby to be sure, but I am already planning cookie and granola bar care packages.

mix sautéed zucchini with eggs and then add corn

This corn and zucchini frittata is one of my daughter’s favorites and a perfect way to enjoy summer’s last gifts before they slip away.  I very often make frittatas on Fridays or the weekend to use up whatever’s left in the fridge and that’s exactly how this one came about.  I had leftover sautéed corn and zucchini from dinner to which I added some beaten eggs and voila!  Our newest favorite frittata was born.

zucchini and corn frittata | pamela salzman

Surprisingly, corn goes so well with eggs and adds a beautiful sweetness, but more importantly, the perfect texture to the soft eggs.  Sometimes I add goat cheese or feta to the top and I’ve even made this for a big crowd by doubling everything and baking it in a parchment-lined baking sheet.

or double the ingredients and pour into a parchment-lined sheet pan

zucchini and corn frittata -- doubled in a sheet pan | pamela salzman

Summer’s bounty is still here, but only for a few fleeting moments longer.  Enjoy every last morsel while you can, because it will slip from your fingers before you’re ready to let it go.

zucchini and corn frittata | Pamela Salzman

5.0 from 2 reviews
Corn and Zucchini Frittata
Author: 
Serves: 6
 
Ingredients
  • 2 Tablespoons unrefined, cold-pressed extra-virgin olive oil + additional
  • 1 bunch scallions, trimmed and sliced
  • 2 cloves garlic, sliced thinly
  • 3 medium zucchini (about 1 pound), ends trimmed and sliced ¼-inch thick by hand or by the slicing disk of the food processor
  • Fine grain sea salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 8 large eggs
  • 1 ½ cups of organic corn kernels, from 2-3 ears (frozen, defrosted is fine)
  • ½ cup grated cheddar or mozzarella or a few crumbles of feta or goat cheese (optional)
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees. In a 10-inch skillet, warm the olive oil. Sauté the scallions until softened. Add the garlic and cook for 1 minute. Add the zucchini slices and a generous pinch of salt and sauté until tender, about 6 minutes.
  2. In a large mixing bowl, beat the eggs, 1 teaspoon salt, and a few grinds of black pepper. Stir the cooked zucchini mixture and the corn (and grated cheese if using) into the eggs and combine well. Pour the mixture back into the skillet. If using feta or goat cheese, scatter the pieces across the top of the egg mixture.
  3. Transfer skillet to the oven and bake until firm, about 40 minutes.
Notes
Alternatively, bake in a larger skillet for less time for a thinner frittata.

Or, cook gently over medium-low heat, covered until slightly set on the bottom, 15-20 minutes.  Transfer the skillet to the oven and broil until the top is slightly puffed and golden, about 3-5 minutes.  Serve warm or room temperature.

Roasted summer vegetable tian recipe

roasted summer vegetable tian | pamelasalzman.com

After Barcelona, we went to Aix-en-Provence, which is the center and heart of Provence, France.  I adore the South of France!  We had a guide for the day since I don’t know the area well and I had no time before we left to do proper research.  I absolutely love hearing about the history of European towns because it puts everything in context.  This wall was here for this reason.  These two towns were perched on opposite hills facing each other for that reason.  Plus the only way to keep my son interested is if you talk drama – wars, fighting, weapons, who won, who got killed, etc.

make a bed of sautéed onions and garlic

More than that, I love seeing how other people live.  Do they drive or walk?  What do they eat for lunch and when?  How much vacation do they get every year?  What’s the coffee shop for locals?  I am very, very nosy!   I was so excited to find and experience the local farmer’s market in Aix and see what is sold here and how it is different from my market in Manhattan Beach.  It thought I was so lucky to be here on market day, until our guide told me the market is open every day until 1:00.  People in Provence prefer to shop daily for their food so it’s really fresh.  Heaven.  It was such beautiful market, where they sold everything from tomatoes, herbs, melons and lettuce, to eggs and the freshest fish, to the most delicious olives ever and lavender sachets with lavender from the fields in Provence.  I could get used to that.

slice vegetables about the same thickness

 

While I was in Provence, I remembered the recipe for this Roasted Summer Vegetable Tian that I taught when I was in France 2 years ago and in my cooking classes in LA last summer.  It’s a very simple, easy, seasonal vegetable side dish and of course, it’s quite delicious.  Who wouldn’t love a casserole with gently cooked onions on the bottom and then a mélange of tomatoes, zucchini and potatoes on top, where the tomato juice kind of infuses everything and mixes with a bit of fresh thyme and some Parmesan cheese?  Yum!  I love it because it goes with anything, whether you are making a piece of grilled fish or some roasted chicken or you want a light vegetarian meal with either a frittata or a simple green salad.  Don’t forget a cold glass of rosé, too!

arrange in dish

It does take some time to cook, so it’s not a last-minute deal.  But you also don’t have to time it perfectly with your meal, since I think it actually tastes just as good warm and even room temp.  You know how I love a good do-ahead!

roasted summer vegetable tian | pamela salzman

 

The one thing I miss when I’m on vacation is cooking at home, especially when I see such beautiful ingredients around me.   For now, I’m picking up inspiration everywhere I go.  Next stop – Italy!

roasted summer vegetable tian | pamela salzman

Roasted Summer Vegetable Tian
Author: 
Serves: 6
 
Ingredients
  • 2 Tablespoons unrefined, cold pressed extra-virgin olive oil + more for drizzling
  • 1 large onion, halved and thinly sliced
  • Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 4 cloves garlic, finely chopped
  • 2 medium Yukon Gold potatoes, about ¾ pound, sliced ¼-inch thick
  • 2 small tomatoes, about ¾ pound, sliced ¼-inch thick
  • 1 medium zucchini, about ½ pound, sliced ¼-inch thick
  • 1 Tablespoon fresh thyme leaves
  • 2 Tablespoons freshly grated Pecorino or Parmesan cheese
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Warm oil in a skillet over medium heat and add onions and a pinch of salt and pepper. Sauté until tender and lightly golden, about 6 to 8 minutes. Add garlic and sauté until fragrant, about 2 minutes.
  2. Transfer onion and garlic on the bottom of an 11 x 9 gratin dish or a 10-inch round baking dish. Overlap potatoes, tomatoes and squash over the onion mixture. Season with salt (I use about ½ teaspoon) and pepper. Sprinkle with thyme and Pecorino/Parmesan and drizzle with olive oil.
  3. Cover and bake for 30 minutes. Uncover and bake another 30 minutes until golden and potatoes are tender. You can serve this hot, warm or at room temperature.
Notes
Try to find potatoes, zucchini and tomatoes with approximately the same diameter so the casserole looks balanced.

You can also add shredded gruyere or buttered bread crumbs to the top for an extra special finish.

 

Grain-free Chocolate Zucchini Cake Recipe and VIDEO

You’re either going to love me or hate me for this post.  Why?  Because this grain-free chocolate cake which just so happens to have zucchini in it is AMAZING.  You will love how rich and chocolaty it is,  how moist and tender.  You will be utterly amazed that this cake has no flour of any kind and that there is zucchini in it.  Zucchini!   It is sweetened with maple syrup and that’s all.  After your first bite, you might exclaim, “Three cheers for Pamela!”

All the ingredients -- one bowl

Orrrrrrr, you will find this cake, which is more like a cross between a brownie and cake, completely irresistible and TOO amazing.  You will walk by it on the countertop and find the uncontrollable need to even out all the edges until you are left with a mere crumb.  But you’ll convince yourself it’s healthful!  It contains almond butter and zucchini.  Zucchini!  And you will not be able to stop eating it.  The next time you make it you will freeze most of it so that you are not tempted by its chocolaty goodness and inhale three-fourths of it before the kids get home.  But you cannot stop dreaming about this cake so you find out it even taste good FROZEN because there is no waiting when it comes to this cake.  And after you eat all of the frozen cake, you might exclaim, “I curse the day I met Pamela!  Darn this chocolate amazingness!”

Batter

 

Grain-free Chocolate Zucchini Cake | Pamela Salzman

And that’s what I’m talking about.

Even Mr. Picky himself went crazy for this cake.  I actually came clean and told him there was zucchini in here and he didn’t care!!  If you are nut-free, don’t sweat.  Substitute sunflower butter in an equal amount and it will work perfectly.  Sunflower butter does have a slightly nuttier flavor, almost like peanut butter.  But I when I made the cake with sunflower butter for some nut-free people, they couldn’t detect it.  Make it.  Devour it. Love it.  Share it.  Tell me all about it.

Grain-free Chocolate Zucchini Cake | Pamela Salzman

Grain-free Chocolate Zucchini Cake | Pamela Salzman

5.0 from 21 reviews
Grain-free Chocolate Zucchini Cake Recipe and VIDEO
Author: 
Serves: makes 1 8 x 8 or 9 x 9-inch cake
 
Ingredients
  • coconut oil or butter for greasing pan
  • 1 cup creamy, unsweetened, unsalted almond butter, raw or roasted, or sunflower butter for a nut-free cake
  • ⅓ cup pure Grade A maple syrup or raw honey
  • ¼ cup raw cacao or cocoa powder
  • ¼ teaspoon fine ground sea salt
  • 1 teaspoon instant coffee powder (optional)
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
  • 1 ½ cups of shredded zucchini, about 2 small
  • 1 cup dark or semi-sweet chocolate chips
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Grease an 8 x 8 or 9 x 9-inch pan. If you want to remove the cake from the pan in one piece, line it with unbleached parchment paper as well.
  2. In a large bowl combine the almond butter, maple syrup, cacao powder, salt, coffee powder, egg, vanilla, and baking soda until smooth.
  3. Stir in zucchini and chocolate chips.
  4. Pour into prepared pan and bake until just set and a toothpick comes out clean or with dry crumbs. Do not overbake. A 9 x 9 pan will take 35-45 minutes. An 8 x 8 pan will take 40-50 minutes. Allow to cool before serving.
Notes
Notes: You can also add ½ cup chopped walnuts or pecans to the batter.

Mediterranean turkey and zucchini burgers recipe

mediterranean turkey and zucchini burgers |  pamela salzman

I’m a happy mama since I picked up Mr. Picky from sleepaway camp on Saturday.  13 days is just too long for me to be apart from that guy.  I have been enjoying all the stories, hanging on every word as if he traveled around the world.  Bless his heart, Mr. Picky “snuck” some food from camp to bring to my husband and me.  Thankfully, it was from breakfast the morning he left and not from last week.  From his backpack he pulled out a paper cup with a few pieces of melon for me and a cup with mini cinnamon buns mixed with tater tots for my husband.  What does that tell you?

grated zucchini

While Mr. Picky can’t stop talking about his counselors, his bunk mates and all the competitions in which he participated, I had to find out about the food.  What was your favorite dinner?  Did you eat any vegetables?  What did you drink?  Blah, blah, blah.  I’m so predictable, but I have no self control.  I have to give the camp props that soda is not served.  I don’t know if I could handle that.

that's everything!

So what I have gathered is that Mr. Picky didn’t eat any protein at breakfast ever since, go figure, the camp doesn’t serve Organic Pastures Raw Organic Milk, and Mr. Picky still doesn’t eat eggs or cheese.  And it also sounds like the only vegetable he ate was cucumber.  So we have some catching up to do!  One thing that my son loves is any type of burger, even veggie burgers.  I made these turkey burgers the week before he left and he loved them so they’re going on the dinner menu again this week.  It’s another winner recipe from Yotam Ottolenghi’s “Jerusalem” cookbook.

12 patties

yogurt-sumac sauce

If you’re bored with plain burgers, these are so different and delicious.  And a great way to make a (small) dent in your zucchini crop.  They are moist, herby and they’ve got a great kick to them.  If spicy isn’t your thing, you may want to cut back to a pinch of cayenne.  Although if you make the sumac sauce, which is delicious, it really cuts the heat from the burgers.  But I’m not really doing dairy these days and Mr. Picky didn’t want any sauce, so I only made half the recipe for the sauce and I thought it was the perfect amount.  I also didn’t use traditional buns when I made these.  Bread will just detract from the tastiness of these burgers!  Instead we ate them on lettuce leaves with some chopped cucumbers and tomatoes, right up my alley.  Of course if you want a more traditional burger, you can probably get 6 “standard” size patties and pile them onto buns with all your favorite fixings.  Delish!

mediterranean turkey and zucchini burgers |  pamela salzman

mediterranean turkey and zucchini burgers recipe
Author: 
Serves: 4-6 (Makes about 18 1½ ounce burgers or 12 2½ ounce burgers)
 
Ingredients
  • 1 pound ground turkey (I like dark meat)
  • 1 large zucchini, coarsely grated (scant 2 cups)
  • 3 green onions, white and green parts, thinly sliced
  • 1 large egg
  • 2 Tablespoons chopped mint
  • 2 Tablespoons chopped cilantro
  • 2 cloves garlic, grated or minced
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt
  • ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • ¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper (perfect for us, but the original recipe called for ½ teaspoon; you can use even less if you don’t want them spicy)
  • unrefined olive oil, coconut oil or ghee for searing
  • For the Sour Cream & Sumac Sauce:
  • Scant ⅓ cup / 75 grams full-fat Greek yogurt
  • Scant ¼ cup sour cream / 50 grams (or use all Greek yogurt)
  • ½ teaspoon grated lemon zest
  • ½ Tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • ½ small clove garlic, grated or minced
  • 2 ¼ teaspoons unrefined, cold pressed, extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 ½ teaspoons sumac
  • ¼ teaspoon sea salt
  • a few grinds of freshly ground black pepper
Instructions
  1. Make the sour cream and sumac sauce by placing all the ingredients in a small bowl. Stir well and set aside or chill until needed.
  2. In a large bowl, combine all the ingredients for the patties except the olive oil. Mix gently with your hands and then shape into about 18 burgers, each weighing about 1 ½ ounces or 12 burgers, each weighing about 2 ½ ounces.
  3. Pour enough oil into a large frying pan to form a layer about 1/16 inch thick on the pan bottom. Heat over medium heat until hot, then sear the patties in batches on both sides. Cook each batch for about 5-7 minutes on each side, adding oil as needed, until golden brown and cooked through.
  4. Serve warm or at room temperature, with the sauce spooned over or on the side.