Celery Root Puree Recipe | Pamela Salzman & Recipes Skip to content

Celery Root Puree Recipe

This is not the first time I have published a recipe featuring celery root. I have a lovely soup in Kitchen Matters with spinach, broccoli and celery root.  Celery root is a non-starchy vegetable with a light celery flavor.  It looks super ugly and intimidating, but once you peel away the outside, the inside is white and easy to cut, much like a potato. Watch my reel on Instagram for a video on how to peel it.  It’s easier than it looks.  I’m posting this Celery Root Puree this week in anticipation of Easter and Passover since it is light, spring-like and would complement any traditional holiday entree.

Why you’ll love this recipe

  • It’s creamy
  • Lighter than regular mashed potatoes
  • Dairy-free
  • So easy!

Celery Puree Ingredients

  • Olive oil: Traditional mashed potatoes call for butter, and you can definitely use butter here, but the olive oil is fruity and goes well with the sauteed shallots and garlic too.
  • Shallot: so mild and sweet, shallots also tenderize very quickly.
  • Garlic: cooking garlic sweetens the harshness and gives a little backbone to this puree.
  • Celery root: has a milder flavor than celery and is non-starchy making this puree mineral-rich, but lower in carbohydrates (think flatten that blood sugar curve!)
  • Yukon gold potatoes: you know these are my favorite potatoes. They’re buttery and have the perfect starch content for this puree.  I take the skin off for a silky smooth puree even though I know I am discarding some nutrition. Feel free to leave it on if you don’t mind a coarser mash.

How to Make Celery Root Puree

  1. In a large saucepan, combine the olive oil and shallots. Cook over medium-low heat until softened, stirring occasionally, about 4 minutes. Add the garlic and cook until soft, about 1 minute. Add the celery root, potato, water to cover, and salt. Bring to a boil, cover, lower to a simmer and cook over medium-low heat until the celery root is very tender, 15 to 20 minutes.
  2. Scoop out a cup of the cooking liquid and reserve; drain the cooked vegetables. Puree the celery root mixture in a food processor or blender until completely smooth, adding a bit of cooking liquid, if necessary (I added 1 Tbsp). If you want this to be a little richer, you can add a Tablespoon or 2 of unsalted butter to the food processor instead of the cooking liquid. Taste for seasoning and add a little extra salt if needed. Once I added a little truffle salt and that was delicious! Serve right away or return to the saucepan and keep warm until ready to use. I have also reheated it the next day in a saucepan over gentle heat.

Tips for Making Celery Root Puree

  • Peel potatoes for a super smooth puree
  • Scrub celery root really well before working with it as it tends to have a lot of dirt
  • If cutting your vegetables in advance, submerge potatoes and celery root in water to prevent them from oxidizing.
  • Save cooking liquid just in case you need to thin out consistency
  • Or add a tablespoon or two of unsalted butter to the food processor instead of the cooking liquid for a richer puree
  • Garnish with fresh herbs (I used chives) before serving for a beautiful presentation

Substitutions for Celery Root Puree

  • Cauliflower – you can check out this recipe for my Cauliflower Mashed Potatoes
  • Broccoli – this recipe is also delicious for a Puree of Broccoli
  • Olive oil – you can swap in a plant butter or regular butter
  • Shallots – swap in standard yellow onion, just use an equivalent amount
  • Potatoes – you can try a peeled white sweet potato which would be sweeter but probably delicious (just different!)

If you give this recipe a try, snap a pic and tag @pamelasalzman so I can see your beautiful creations. I also really appreciate readers taking the time to leave a rating and review! Lastly, subscribe for free to my site for the latest recipes and updates.

For more delicious recipes, check out my monthly online cooking classes.

Celery Root Puree
Author: 
Serves: 4-6
 
Ingredients
  • ¼ cup unrefined, cold-pressed extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 medium shallot, thinly sliced
  • 4 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
  • 2-3 medium celery roots (aka celeriac), peeled and coarsely chopped into large pieces, about 2 pounds
  • 1 pound Yukon Gold potatoes, peeled and coarsely chopped into pieces a little smaller than the celery root*
  • Water to cover
  • 2 teaspoons kosher salt (because the cooking liquid will mostly get discarded, I am using Diamond Crystal kosher salt which is less expensive than sea salt)
  • Sea salt if needed
Instructions
  1. In a large saucepan, combine the olive oil and shallots. Cook over medium-low heat until softened, stirring occasionally, about 4 minutes. Add the garlic and cook until soft, about 1 minute. Add the celery root, potato, water to cover, and salt. Bring to a boil, cover, lower to a simmer and cook over medium-low heat until the celery root is very tender, 15 to 20 minutes.
  2. Scoop out a cup of the cooking liquid and reserve; drain the cooked vegetables. Puree the celery root mixture in a food processor or blender until completely smooth, adding a bit of cooking liquid, if necessary (I added 1 Tbsp). If you want this to be a little richer, you can add a Tablespoon or 2 of unsalted butter to the food processor instead of the cooking liquid. Taste for seasoning and add a little extra salt if needed. Once I added a little truffle salt and that was delicious! Serve right away or return to the saucepan and keep warm until ready to use. I have also reheated it the next day in a saucepan over gentle heat.
Notes
Celery Root is also known as Celeriac and is a type of celery grown for its root, rather than the stalks and leaves. I use the stalks and leaves in vegetable and chicken stocks.
Do not prep the celery root ahead of time unless you are prepared to cover the pieces in cold water to prevent oxidation.
*or swap in cauliflower florets

 

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I come from a large Italian-American family with 28 first cousins (on one side of the family!) where sit-down holiday dinners for 85 people are the norm (how, you might ask – organization! But more on that later …).

Some of my fondest memories are of simple family gatherings, both large and small, with long tables of bowls and platters piled high, the laughter of my cousins echoing and the comfort of tradition warming my soul.

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