Vegan chocolate chip oatmeal cookies recipe | Pamela Salzman & Recipes Skip to content

Vegan chocolate chip oatmeal cookies recipe

A funny thing happens when people start cooking healthful food for family and friends.  They feel the need to announce that fact to everyone before serving it.  “Ok, guys.  Wait until you try this muffin!  It’s made with flaxseeds and almond meal and it has no sugar!  It’s unbelievable!”  Of course everyone else is thinking it’s probably unbelievably bad and unbelievably tasteless.   Or students will come to my class and go home very motivated (a good thing) to overhaul the pantry, the refrigerator and the family diet.  And even though I urge them not to, they feel compelled to sit the family down and tell them how “things are going to change around here!  There will be no more sugar!  Or processed snacks!  Suzy, spit out that gum.  Don’t you know aspartame is the number one food-related complaint to the FDA?”  Unfortunately, despite our well-meaning intentions, this strategy rarely elicits a positive response.

On the other hand, I love being able to share recipes that are delicious, easy, and just so happen to be good for you.  Take these chocolate chip oatmeal cookies, for example.  Using a base of walnuts, maple syrup and a touch of coconut oil in place of butter and eggs, these are just darn tasty and not-so-shabby, nutritionally-speaking.

Valentine’s Day is right around the corner and if your school or office allows treats to be brought in, why not make a batch of these?  Like many cookie recipes, you can make the dough several days in advance and keep it covered in the refrigerator.  Take it out when you’re ready to bake and scoop it onto your cookie sheets.  You can even freeze the cookies unbaked.  Arrange them in a single layer on the baking sheet and place the pan in the freezer.  Once the cookies are frozen solid, transfer them to an airtight container and keep them frozen until you’re ready to bake.  Then just place them on a prepared baking sheet directly from the freezer and add another minute or two to the baking time.

Chocolate Chip Oatmeal Cookies Recipe

Yes, I know it is so very exciting that they are full of fiber and contain no refined sugar.  No animal products either, if that’s important to you.  You can even make them gluten-free by using gluten-free oats.  But no need to go around saying, “OMG!  Try these cookies!  They’re gluten-free and they’re VEEE-GAN!”  Unless your motivation is to discourage any takers and to keep them all for yourself. Hmmmmm……

4.8 from 16 reviews
Vegan Chocolate Chip Oatmeal Cookies
Author: 
Serves: makes 30 2½-inch cookies
 
Ingredients
  • 1 ½ cups oat flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon fine grain sea salt
  • ¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 2 cups raw walnuts
  • 3 Tablespoons melted coconut oil
  • 1 cup 100% pure maple syrup
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 2 cups rolled oats
  • 12 ounces or 1 ½ cups chocolate chips
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Line 2 baking sheets with parchment paper.
  2. *If you need to make oat flour, place 1 ¾ cups rolled oats in a food processor and process until powdery.
  3. Place oat flour, baking soda, salt and cinnamon in a mixing bowl and whisk together.
  4. Place walnuts in a food processor and blend into a fine meal. Add oil, maple syrup and vanilla and process until mixture has the consistency of natural nut butter.
  5. Stir walnut mixture into flour mixture. Fold in 2 cups rolled oats and chocolate chips.
  6. Use a 1 ¾ -inch ice cream scooper to form dough into balls, and place on baking sheets. You can fit 12 on a sheet. Flatten cookies slightly with a damp hand. Bake 13-15 minutes or until cookies begin to brown and tops look dry.
  7. Cool a few minutes and then transfer to wire rack to cool completely.

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Comments

117 Comments

  1. Just before you baked them, were you adding salt to the top of each one?

    • Sometimes I add a small pinch of flaky sea salt to the top of chocolate chip cookies before I bake them. Completely optional, but adds an extra flavor boost.

  2. If I want to replace the walnuts what do you suggest? Would peanut butter work?

    • In my new book, Quicker Than Quick, I created a version of this recipe with peanut butter, but’s it’s not a 1-to-1 swap. If you have cashews or pecans at home, you can try either of those or a combo.

  3. These and your peanut butter oatmeal chocolate chip cookies from QTQ sound amazing! I’ll be making both but want to add brewers yeast because I’m nursing and want to boost my milk supply. Do you recommend adding additional wet ingredients to balance it out?

    • I think it depends on how much you want to add. You might even be able to replace some of the flour with BY, but I have no idea how that would turn out. When you bake the cookies, check on them earlier than the recipe indicates since they may be drier.

  4. Just made these and they are AMAZING!!!! Substituted chocolate for sultanas and they are sooo tasty. Thank you for bringing us this joy!!!

    • Oatmeal-raisin (sultana) is a winner in my book!

  5. These were fantastic! The texture, taste, convenience of freezing a roll and slicing/baking… absolutely loved it and is my new go-to recipe 🙂 I split the batch in 2, making half as chocolate chip and half as oatmeal raisin (for my husband – die-hard fan). He’s pretty quick to question anything remotely healthy but said these were incredible and couldn’t get enough! A super easy and convenient option for both of us to enjoy!

    • So glad they are hubby-approved!

  6. Love these cookies! Can you refrigerate dough overnight before baking? And if so, is it best to refrigerate in a log or in balls? Thanks!

    • Yes, you can! Either way, but when you refrigerate as a log, then you slice and bake and the appearance is a little different.


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I come from a large Italian-American family with 28 first cousins (on one side of the family!) where sit-down holiday dinners for 85 people are the norm (how, you might ask – organization! But more on that later …).

Some of my fondest memories are of simple family gatherings, both large and small, with long tables of bowls and platters piled high, the laughter of my cousins echoing and the comfort of tradition warming my soul.

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