Roasted Vegetable Buddha Bowl with Lemon-Tahini Dressing Recipe

Roasted Vegetable Buddha Bowl with Lemon Tahini Dressing | Pamela Salzman

We all have those recipes we love but don’t make very often (for me it’s chicken pot pie and spanakopita.)  And then there are the recipes you rely on when you don’t want to think about what to make.  Those are your go-to, no-fail, everyone-loves-this recipes.  I wish I had an endless supply of those.  But I am going to share one of my-go’s with you today!  This roasted veggie buddha bowl is just that.  I swear I could eat this every day.  I taught this recipe in my classes in January and I actually did eat it every day and I never got tired of it.

Vegetables reading for roasting

A Buddha bowl is really just a simple combination of (usually) lightly steamed vegetables on top of a gluten-free grain, like brown rice, and often topped with a sauce or dressing of sorts.  It is a very clean and healthful meal, but very satisfying.  Personally, I prefer all my meals in a bowl.  I love when all my food gets combined and every bite has a little bit of everything.  It’s Mr. Picky’s worst nightmare.

After you roast your vegetables, add kale and roast some more

A Buddha bowl is flexible.  Clean out of the vegetable crisper and use what you’ve got.  Not in the mood for rice?  Use quinoa or millet.  Soy or peanut-based sauces are very popular on Buddha bowls, but I am kind of obsessed with my lemon-tahini dressing from this salad, so I adapted that for this recipe.  And even though I said a Buddha bowl is usually made with steamed vegetables, who says you can’t roast them?  Like with a little coconut oil until the edges are just a bit crispy.  Heaven!

Perfectly roasted veggies and crispy kale

I make dinner for my family every night (and if you follow me on Instagram or Facebook, you would know exactly what that looks like!)  Even though I am a big proponent of one meal for all, there always those days I ate a late lunch after a class and I’m not feeling like the roast chicken and potatoes I am making for dinner that night.  This Buddha bowl is my go-to on nights like that.  I’ll make a big pan of roasted veggies for all of us and then whip up this dressing and a pot of steamed quinoa and voila!  I have something a little lighter and I’m a happy camper.  That’s not to say that my husband and my kids don’t like Buddha bowls.  They all really do, especially my girls.  As you would imagine, Mr. Picky doesn’t exactly eat his in a bowl.  Rice in one separate, distinct area on a plate, roasted veg in another and hold the dressing, please.  No problem, dude.

lemon-tahini dressing

If you decide to make this dressing for your Buddha bowl, you really have a nice vegetarian meal no matter what grain you use since tahini is basically just sesame paste.  Sesame seeds are high in protein, good fats and did you know, calcium?  Just good to know if you’re looking for non-dairy sources of calcium.  And if you make this with broccoli and kale, you have a very calcium-rich meal.  I also like to sprinkle everything my Buddha bowl with gomasio, a macrobiotic condiment which is just a mixture of sesame seeds and sea salt.  The one I use by Eden Organic also has seaweed in it.  If you have all the other ingredients, but not the gomasio, make this anyway — you will love it and you will feel awesome after eating it.  Have a lovely weekend!

How to assemble your buddha bowl

ready for a bite

so yummy

 

5.0 from 1 reviews
Roasted Vegetable Buddha Bowl with Lemon-Tahini Dressing
Author: 
Serves: 4-6
 
Ingredients
  • Dressing (makes about 2 Tablespoons/serving):
  • 3 Tablespoons fresh lemon juice, about 1 small lemon
  • 2 small cloves of garlic, grated or minced or just smash the cloves if you don't actually want to eat the garlic, but still have a subtle garlic flavor
  • ¼ cup raw tahini (roasted tahini is fine, but raw is a little milder)
  • 3-4 Tablespoons room temperature or warm water
  • ¼ cup unrefined, cold-pressed, extra-virgin olive oil
  • ¾ teaspoon sea salt + more to taste
  • pinch of cayenne (optional)
  • 8-10 cups mixed vegetables such as 1 head of broccoli, cut into bite-sized florets and stems, trimmed and chopped AND 1 head cauliflower, cut into bite-sized florets*
  • 2 Tablespoons melted unrefined coconut oil or unrefined olive oil
  • 3-4 large leaves of kale, washed, dried, stems removed
  • Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • Steamed brown rice, millet or quinoa for serving (optional)
  • Plain or seaweed gomasio for sprinkling on top (optional)
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Line a large baking sheet with unbleached parchment paper.
  2. Make the dressing (or you can make while the vegetables are roasting): in a small bowl, whisk together the lemon juice, garlic, tahini, water, olive oil, salt and cayenne until well blended. Just use the amount of water you need to get the consistency you want.
  3. In a large bowl, toss the broccoli and cauliflower with the coconut oil. Don’t wash the bowl yet. Place the broccoli and cauliflower in one layer on the prepared baking sheet. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Roast for about 20-30 minutes, or until tender and golden in spots. I like to turn the vegetables after about 15 minutes.
  4. Take the kale leaves and rub them around the bowl with any remaining coconut oil until lightly coated. Tear until large pieces and sprinkle with a pinch of salt and pepper. Place on top of the broccoli and cauliflower in the oven and roast until the kale is just crispy, about 5-10 minutes.
  5. If you’d like to eat this as a “bowl,” place a scoop of rice/millet/quinoa in a bowl and top with the vegetables. Spoon some sauce over everything and sprinkle with gomasio, if desired.
Notes
*Other roasted veggies that would be great are beets, carrots, and sweet potatoes!

Roasted baby potatoes with broccoli and cheese recipe

perfect little bite

Because I have no association with either football team in this year’s Super Bowl, all I really care about is what we’re going to eat!  I’m have no need to read the sports pages or listen to the experts, trying to figure out if my team has a wining chance.  No big deal. I’ll just ponder my repertoire of chili recipes and decide what other deliciousness I can whip together for our little group.  I asked Daughter #1 for some suggestions, and she started begging me for these little cheesy broccoli potato bites.  Great idea!

little yukon golds

slice in half

I’ll be honest, I don’t normally make these for the Super Bowl because I usually have a baked potato bar happening and that would be a little redundant.  But I do make these baby potato hors d’oeuvres very often for dinner parties, sometimes with broccoli, sometimes with lemon creme fraiche and smoked salmon or roasted cherry tomatoes.  But for the Super Bowl, I keep things really casual.  Broccoli it is!

roast potato halves cut-side down

Just like the mini chicken tostadas I posted the other day, I actually think a mini version of a baked potato is better than the  real thing.  These little bites are super easy to eat and you get the perfect ratio of potato to broccoli to cheese.  And the entire bite has a nice bit of saltiness and crispiness.  Love it.  AND I think we can all agree, this is reasonably healthful stuff to boot!  Even if you don’t eat cheese, I’m sure you have found a good non-dairy cheese that you can sub for the mozzarella here.  Keep in mind, the melted cheese is what helps the broccoli stick to the potato.

the cheese helps the broccoli stick to the potatoes

Although these baby potatoes are great any time of the year, I do think they’re better suited for cooler weather, or maybe I should say mind-numbing cold weather, depending on where you live.   Ugh, sorry if that’s you.  Regardless, these bites could very well be the perfect party food.  They’re delicious right out of the oven, but they also stay warm for quite a bit.  And I think they taste perfectly delicious at room temp, too.  You can make the potatoes and the broccoli the day before and then just assemble them with the cheese and bake before you want to serve them.  I promise, these will score you major points!

mini potato broccoli cheese bites | pamela salzman

I could actually eat way more than three of these!

Roasted Baby Potatoes with Broccoli and Cheese
Author: 
Serves: makes 24 pieces
 
Ingredients
  • 12 small potatoes, scrubbed and halved (I cut in half the long way)
  • 1 Tablespoon unrefined cold-pressed extra-virgin olive oil
  • Fine grain sea salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • 1 pound broccoli crowns, cut into 24 bite-size florets
  • ⅓ cup shredded mozzarella or fontina cheese
  • 3 Tablespoons grated Parmesan or Pecorino-Romano (optional)
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Line a baking pan with parchment paper.
  2. Place potatoes in a bowl and toss with olive oil and sprinkle with a pinch of salt and pepper.
  3. Place potatoes on parchment paper – cut side down and bake for 30 minutes (until golden brown and tender). Leave oven on if serving right away.
  4. Place broccoli in a steamer over boiling water and steam until just tender, about 3 minutes (or blanched in salted water for 2 minutes.) If cooking the broccoli ahead of time, remove from the pot and immediately refresh under cold water to stop the cooking process.
  5. Top each potato with a pinch of cheese and then a broccoli floret and bake until cheese is melted or broil it for a few minutes to speed things up.
  6. Sprinkle each with a pinch of grated cheese, if desired.
Notes
Potatoes can be made the day before and refrigerated; broccoli can be blanched the day before and refrigerated.

Other complementary toppings include smoked salmon and crème fraiche, pesto and roasted cherry tomato halves

Balsamic-roasted broccoli and cherry tomatoes recipe

balsamic-roasted broccoli and cherry tomatoes | pamela salzman

I’d like to sneak in a nutritious recipe before Halloween if you’ll let me.  I need to one last swan song before local tomatoes go out of season until next June.  Moment of silence.  Until then, I am enjoying these sweet little orbs as much as I can.  I have always had a soft spot for cherry tomatoes, which seem to be consistently sweet as sugar.  I love to make a quick sauce out of them for pasta and they don’t weigh down salads like a chopped up beefsteak.  And as sweet as they are raw, they are even more so and more tomato-y roasted.

chop your garlic

This is a super easy and delicious way to enjoy broccoli and tomatoes while they are in season at the same time.  What I love about this combo is how the juice from the tomatoes mingles with the balsamic vinegar and olive oil and gets trapped in the nooks and crannies of the broccoli florets.  So delish.  You can keep it really simple here and just roast the veggies with garlic, balsamic and oil or add a little fresh basil at the end like I did.  If you want to get fancy, toss on some toasted pine nuts and a few shavings of Parmesan cheese.  You can’t go wrong.  I think you could also make the same thing with eggplant and cherry tomatoes or zucchini and cherry tomatoes.  I served this the other night with some roasted salmon and corn-chimichurri sauce.  Yum!

balsamic-roasted broccoli and cherry tomatoes | pamela salzman

balsamic-roasted broccoli and cherry tomatoes | pamela salzman

Forgive the short post today, but as I mentioned in a previous post, I’m not very organized in areas of my life that don’t relate to food.  As I predicted, Mr. Picky’s birthday party is being held tomorrow, 3 1/2 weeks after his real birthday.  I can’t remember the last time his party was actually in September.  Am I lame, or what?  He’s being a good sport about it and said, “That’s okay, Mom.  It makes my birthday last longer.”  Love that little guy.  I was actually so proud of myself that my son and I pulled together his Halloween costume already.  That’s about 2 1/2 weeks earlier than normal!  And then I opened my mail today and saw two catalogs for holiday cards.  I mean, really.

balsamic-roasted broccoli and cherry tomatoes | pamela salzman

balsamic-roasted broccoli and cherry tomatoes | pamela salzman

4.5 from 2 reviews
Balsamic-Roasted Broccoli and Cherry Tomatoes
Author: 
Serves: 6
 
Ingredients
  • 1 pound broccoli crowns, cut into florets and stems sliced
  • 1 pint cherry tomatoes, halved
  • 3 garlic cloves, chopped (or halve the garlic cloves for a more subtle flavor)
  • 2 Tablespoons unrefined olive oil or melted coconut oil (I prefer the taste of olive oil here.)
  • 1 Tablespoon balsamic vinegar (don’t use the super expensive kind in this recipe)
  • ¾ teaspoon fine ground sea salt
  • freshly ground pepper to taste
  • some fresh slivered basil to garnish (optional)
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Line a large baking sheet with parchment paper.
  2. Place the broccoli, tomatoes and garlic on the prepared pan. Drizzle with oil and vinegar and toss to combine. Spread out in a single layer on the pan and sprinkle with salt and pepper.
  3. Roast for 30 minutes.
  4. Serve hot or at room temperature. Garnish with fresh basil if you have it. Don’t worry about it if you don’t.
Notes
Broccoli "crowns" refer to just the tops, with minimal stalks.  I use the stems for juicing or for this delicious Broccoli Stalk Soup.

Broccoli stalk soup recipe

This month I’ve been teaching a broccoli and cauliflower stir-fry in my classes.  I am using only the florets since I know the stalks aren’t as popular in my house.  It’s all very well and good, except for the fact that I’ve been left at the end of each week with a heck of a lot of broccoli stalks.  I’m sure you’ve gathered by now that I am a compulsive use-everything-you’ve-got kind of a cook.  I absolutely hate to waste food!  In fact, I started a tradition in the house called “Frittata Fridays.”  That’s when I pull together bits of leftovers and random vegetables and turn them into breakfast.  Everyone’s happy!

So in order to not throw away the perfectly good broccoli stalks, I have been juicing lots of them into our juices.  But there’s only so much of that I can take.  What else could I use them for?   On a whim I decided to see if I could turn the stalks in a pureed soup like my Cauliflower and Roasted Garlic Soup, which is one of my absolute favorites.  My biggest concern was that the stalks wouldn’t have enough flavor and the soup would taste like nothing — WRONG!  It was delicious.  Warm, rich, creamy and using one of my favorite soup-thickening techniques (cooking and pureeing Yukon Gold potatoes with the soup), it tasted like there was lots of cream or butter when there was none.

Nutritionally speaking, the stalks are quite comparable to the florets, which is awesome since broccoli is once of those super foods you should be eating a lot of (and not throwing into the garbage!)  In fact, I’m big on the whole cruciferous family of vegetables which includes all the cabbages, kale, bok choy, cauliflower, brussels sprouts, collard greens and more.  These vegetables contain incredible amounts of vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, cancer-fighting compounds, and even protein.  Load up, people!

I enjoyed this soup straight away with an extra pinch of flaky sea salt and a few grinds of black pepper.  My husband stirred into his bowl a big pinch of shredded raw cheddar cheese and thought that was great.  For the girls, I made them grilled raw cheddar cheese and kale pesto sandwiches on spelt bread and they loved dipping those into the soup.  Even Mr. Picky finished his entire bowl — plain of course, with absolutely nothing added.  This was a winner all around!

 

4.9 from 16 reviews
Broccoli Stalk Soup
Author: 
Serves: 6
 
Ingredients
  • 2 Tablespoons unsalted butter or unrefined cold-pressed olive oil
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 2 large garlic cloves, chopped
  • 2 ¼ - 2 ½ pounds broccoli stalks, ends and any tough woody layers removed
  • 1 large Yukon Gold potato, about 8 ounces, peeled if desired and cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 6 cups chicken or vegetable stock, preferably homemade
  • 2-3 teaspoons sea salt
  • freshly ground pepper to taste
Instructions
  1. In a large pot over medium heat, melt the butter or warm the oil. Add the onion and garlic and sauté, covered, until tender and translucent, about 6 minutes.
  2. Add the broccoli, potato, stock and salt. Bring to a boil over high heat and then lower to a simmer. Cook partially covered until potatoes and broccoli stalks are tender, about 20 minutes.
  3. Puree soup with an immersion blender or in batches in a blender. Taste for seasoning.
Notes
You can stir in shredded cheese before serving, garnish with grated Parmesan or Pecorino, top with grilled cheese croutons or chopped chives

 

 

Stir-fried Grass-fed Beef and Broccoli

Happy Chinese New Year! Mr. Picky is very excited to celebrate the holiday at his school today and the girls are happy that I’ll be making a Chinese meal for dinner tonight. I’m fun that way! My whole family loves Chinese food, especially stir-fries which are surprisingly easy to make at home and so versatile. One of their favorite dishes is Beef and Broccoli which I serve with sesame spinach salad, mixed greens with miso-ginger dressing or steamed brown rice.

Typically I make beef more in the winter than in the summer since it is such a warming food, but we have really cut back on our beef consumption in general, mostly due to animal welfare and environmental reasons. When we do eat beef, it’s always grass-fed, which is just so much more nutritious than corn/grain-fed. I am fortunate to have many local farmer’s markets where I can buy excellent quality grass-fed meat. If you don’t have a good resource for grass-fed meat, check the Eat Wild website to locate a source close to you. Grass-fed beef can be a bit trickier to cook since it has a lower fat content than grain-fed beef and it can get dried out. But with this marinade and the quick-cooking of a stir-fry, it’s terrific!

I love loading up stir-fries with lots of fresh vegetables, especially from the cruciferous family. I try not to rant and rave about all the health benefits of plant foods since they are all basically good for you. But there are some vegetables that do deserve special mention here and more regular place in your diet. The cruciferous vegetables contain loads of nutrients, including some very powerful cancer-fighting compounds. Besides broccoli, other members of this group include cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, cabbages, bok choy, kale and a few others.

Don’t let the list of ingredients in this recipe discourage you. This dish is really not complicated and there are many substitutions that can be made. If you’re vegetarian, you can use extra-firm tofu in place of the beef and substitute additional shoyu in place of the oyster sauce. Gluten-free folks can use GF tamari instead of shoyu.

Here are a couple of tips to making a good stir-fry:

  • Have all your ingredients prepped and ready since stir-frying goes very quickly.
  • Cut all your vegetables the same size so that they cook evenly.
  • Don’t double recipes for stir-fries and try to cook it all in one wok/skillet. It’s important for all the food to come into contact with the surface of the pan. If you need to double, cook the recipe in two batches or in two separate pans.
  • You don’t need a wok to stir-fry. A large skillet will be just fine.
  • If you want to vary the vegetables in your stir-fry, keep in mind whether they can be stir-fried raw or if they need to be blanched first. Examples of vegetables you can throw into the pan raw are cabbage, mushrooms, thinly sliced carrots, celery, bean sprouts and snow peas. Broccoli, cauliflower, shelled edamame and big chunks of carrots should all be blanched before adding to the wok.

Although it’s tempting to celebrate Chinese New Year by ordering take-out, it’s so much better for you and your family if you can cook at home. In fact, with this recipe, they might not even know the difference.

For a few more of our favorite Chinese dishes, check out recipes for Vegetable Fried Rice, Asian Noodle Salad and Sesame Spinach Salad (perhaps only Chinese-inspired.)

Stir-fried Grass-fed Beef and Broccoli
Author: 
Serves: 4-6, depending on what else you're serving
 
Ingredients
  • 1 ½ pounds grass-fed top sirloin or flank steak, trimmed of excess fat and cut against the grain into ⅛-inch thick slices*
  • Marinade:
  • 1 Tablespoon arrowroot or non-GMO cornstarch
  • 3 Tablespoons shoyu or gluten-free tamari
  • 3 Tablespoons water
  • 1 ½ Tablespoons dry sherry or Chinese rice wine such as Shao Hsing
  • 1 ½ teaspoons toasted sesame oil
  • Sauce:
  • 2 Tablespoons oyster sauce (or substitute extra shoyu, but oyster sauce makes it taste like it's from a restaurant)
  • 1 Tablespoon shoyu or gluten-free tamari
  • 1 Tablespoons dry sherry or Chinese rice wine such as Shao Hsing (I always use sherry)
  • 3 Tablespoons water
  • 2 teaspoons balsamic vinegar (optional-for sweetness)
  • 1 Tablespoon arrowroot or non-GMO cornstarch
  • 1 bunch broccoli, cut into small florets, stems peeled and thinly sliced
  • 2 Tablespoons unrefined peanut oil
  • 2 quarter-size pieces of fresh, peeled ginger
  • 1 scallion, thinly sliced (optional)
  • 2 cloves of garlic, crushed
Instructions
  1. In a medium bowl, whisk together all marinade ingredients until arrowroot is dissolved. Transfer beef to marinade and stir to coat. Allow to marinate at room temperature for 30-60 minutes.
  2. Make the sauce: place all sauce ingredients in a small bowl and whisk until arrowroot is dissolved. Set aside.
  3. Bring an inch or two of salted water to a boil in the wok and add the broccoli. Cover and steam until crisp tender, about 2 minutes. Drain and reserve.
  4. Heat the wok over medium-high heat. Drain the beef in a colander. Add peanut oil and tilt to coat sides of wok. Add ½ of beef to wok, spreading it in one layer on the surface of the wok and allow to cook undisturbed for 1 minute or until brown. Turn beef over and cook for another 30 seconds. Transfer meat to a medium bowl. Cook remaining beef in the same manner, adding more oil if necessary. When the last batch of beef is almost finished cooking, add the ginger, scallion and garlic and stir-fry until fragrant, about 1 minute.
  5. Add the sauce and reserved meat back to the wok. Bring the sauce to a boil and cook until thickened, about 2 minutes. Toss in the broccoli and stir to coat with the sauce.
Notes
*Freezing the meat for about an hour can make this job easier.

 

Vegetable fried rice recipe

When parents struggle with “what to make for dinner,” one tip I like to offer is to find a dish that everyone likes to eat when you go out, and try to make it at home.  Fried rice, however, is a food that I thought I could never make at home.  I don’t know why it seemed to be out of my cooking league and only something the family could enjoy on the three annual birthday trips to Benihana.  But the last time we were there for Mr. Picky’s birthday, I watched in amazement at what it took for our chef to make fried rice — not a lot!  I could make this at home!  I took mental notes of what was used on the griddle — cold rice, beaten eggs, a few vegetables, soy sauce and a curious creamy spread our chef told me was “garlic butter.”  Hmmm…..

Before I gave this a go at home, I needed to check around a bit to see if there was anything else I needed to know.  It seems that fried rice is actually pretty straightforward provided you do one very important thing — use cold, cooked rice.  Warnings abounded wherever I turned — one can never, ever, possibly even consider making fried rice with fresh rice otherwise you will have a mushy, disastrous mess.  One thing you need to know about me is that I am a naysayer.  Oh, really?  Well I need to see it to believe it.  And I that’s how I learned….never to use fresh rice when making fried rice because I’m here to tell you that you will indeed have a mushy, disastrous mess.

Fried rice is something that was invented in order to use up leftover rice and whatever bits of vegetables and meat you have from the night before.  It is eaten as a snack in China, never as a meal.  Don’t tell my kids, because they’re getting it as an entree.  When you add scrambled eggs, peas, shiitake mushrooms and broccoli to long-grain brown rice, you have yourself plenty of protein.  I often pack this the next day in a stainless thermos for the kids’ lunch and I have enjoyed it for breakfast as well.  It is actually the perfect little meal with protein, good carbs, and some fat for stable blood sugar and long-lasting energy.

Stir-frying anything requires all your chopping to be done in advance since things move so quickly.  You can get this out of the way as early as the night before, if you want.  If you have leftover rice and all your vegetables are prepped ahead, fried rice can be cooked in minutes.  Traditionally in China, the eggs are added with the rice so that the egg coats each grain of rice.  I do it a little differently since Mr. Picky doesn’t enjoy eggs yet.  I cook the beaten eggs in ghee (a clarified butter great for higher heat cooking) first and then remove them, chop them up and add them in at the end.  That way Mr. Picky can pick out all the egg easily.

You can really add whatever vegetables you have on hand and you certainly don’t need to use as many as I do. (The vegetables above were used in fried rice I made for a class where the recipe was doubled.)  The key is to dice everything pretty small, about the size of peas, although the broccoli can be slightly larger.  That way you can stir-fry them in the wok or pan and you don’t need to blanche them in a separate saucepan.  I like washing dishes as much as Mr. Picky likes eggs.  If your picky eater won’t go for brown rice, he’ll never know it here.  The shoyu is going to change the color of the rice to brown anyway.  To make this gluten-free, substitute wheat-free tamari and you’re all set.  Vegans can drop the egg, use all sesame oil and still enjoy a high-protein dish.  Don’t forget — Chinese New Year begins on February 3rd!

5.0 from 1 reviews
Vegetable Fried Rice
Author: 
Serves: 6 as a side dish, 4 as a main
 
Ingredients
  • 2 Tablespoons ghee, divided
  • 2 large eggs, beaten
  • 1 Tablespoon toasted sesame oil, plus more for drizzling if desired
  • 1 teaspoon grated or minced peeled, fresh ginger
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 4 scallions, sliced thinly on the diagonal
  • Vegetables:
  • 1 carrot, diced
  • 1 onion, diced
  • ½ cup frozen peas, defrosted
  • Handful of shiitake mushrooms, stems removed; caps wiped clean and diced
  • 1 head broccoli, cut into very small florets and stems diced, about 2 cups
  • 4 cups COLD, COOKED brown rice, preferably long-grain
  • 2 Tablespoons shoyu or more to taste (I tend to go more)
  • Toasted sesame seeds for garnish (optional)
Instructions
  1. Heat a wok or large sauté pan over medium-high heat. Add 1 Tablespoon ghee. Scramble the eggs in the pan until cooked through. Transfer the eggs to a cutting board and set aside.
  2. Add 1 Tablespoon sesame oil and 1 Tablespoon ghee to the wok. Saute the ginger, garlic and scallions until fragrant, about 1 minute.
  3. Add the vegetables and sauté until softened. Add the rice and shoyu and toss everything around in the wok until heated through. Chop up the cooked eggs and stir into the rice. Taste for seasoning and add additional shoyu or sesame oil, if desired. Sprinkle with sesame seeds for fun!
Notes
If you are using leftover cooked vegetables or meat, dice them up and add with the rice.

I shared this recipe with Healthy Child, Healthy World!